Beetroot Leaf Boorani

Like this recipe? You’ll love my online Persian cooking class!

Beetroot Leaf Boorani

Fresh crisp beetroot leaves make a great addition to a salad or a Persian herb platter (sabzi khordan), but they tend not to be valued in Australia. They’re generally chopped off the beets and thrown out, so they’re usually not in great condition; but it’s surprising what a good soak in a sink of cold water can reveal. Rather than waste those wilted beetroot leaves and stems next time you have a bunch of beetroot, try this deliciously easy Persian dip, beetroot leaf boorani. For a great start to the meal, pour a glass of Latta Rattlesnake Contact Blanc with this dip, a delicious full-bodied blend of riesling, viognier, sauv blanc and gewürz from Owen Latta in the Victorian Pyrenees. Scroll down to the FAQ below to discover more about Persian cuisine. Use the beetroot roots to make borani laboo and, if you have a spare one, make easy Lebanese pink pickled turnips.

Serves 4 as a starter

Ingredients
  • 1 bunch beetroot (about 4 roots)
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling
  • Salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1 cup thick natural yoghurt
  • 1 teaspoon dried mint
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped walnuts
  • 1 piece sangak or other flatbread

 

In Sydney, you’ll find sangak at Sangak Bakery in Guildford. It freezes well: wrap tightly in plastic wrap, place in a freezer bag and freeze asap. To use, remove from bag and remove plastic wrap, wrap in aluminium foil and place in a 180°C oven for about 10 minutes, until warmed through, cut in half to serve. Refrigerate any leftover wrapped in the foil and toast the next day.

Method
  1. Cut the leaves and stems off the beetroot, leaving about 5cm attached to the root. Set roots aside for another dish.
  2. Place leaves and stems in a sink of cold water for about an hour (or overnight); don’t worry if they’re wilted or damaged, at this stage soak them all.
  3. Once they’ve had a good soak, inspect them and discard any that are still wilted; dry the rest well.
  4. Slice the leaves off the stems, reserving both separately.
  5. Finely chop stems and finely shred the leaves.
  6. Place oil in a heavy-based frying pan over medium heat, add stems and a good pinch of salt, cover and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  7. Reduce heat to low–medium, stir in leaves, cover and cook for a further 5 minutes or so, until completely wilted.
  8. Add garlic, increase heat to medium and stir for a minute or so, until well distributed and aromatic.
  9. Tip into a colander and set aside to cool.
  10. Meanwhile, place yoghurt in a bowl with a good grind of pepper, add mint, rubbing it between your hands to crush it, and stir to combine well.
  11. Squeeze cooled beetroot gently to remove excess moisture then stir into the yoghurt mixture. Taste and add salt.
  12. Spread beetroot leaf boorani into a shallow bowl, sprinkle with walnut, drizzle with oil, and serve with bread on the side.

Share page on:

Discussing Persian Food

Join Me Soon

What Our Cooks Say

Melisa (Beacon Hill, NSW)
Melisa (Beacon Hill, NSW)
Read More
We made the pot-sticker dumplings and bang bang chicken from the Chinese class the other night. Once again both exceeded our expectations. My husband keeps saying it’s better than going out to restaurants as the recipes and quality are amazing.
Glennis (Caringbah South, NSW)
Glennis (Caringbah South, NSW)
Read More
The whole Be Inspired experience has helped me love cooking again. I was sick of cooking the same old things - meal time is a lot brighter thanks to you Roberta.
Pam (Cammeray, NSW)
Pam (Cammeray, NSW)
Read More
Your recipes are something I always feel confident offering guests and also reasonable in the time to prepare. We often try your recommended wines and suppliers and enjoy your travel tales too!
Jen (Tamarama, NSW)
Jen (Tamarama, NSW)
Read More
Thank you for stocking our pantry with such authentic Ingredients and quality produce. We really like the flexibility of cooking over a couple of days and changing the order we cook the dishes in when we want to. And I love listening to the themed playlist while cooking.
Katrina (Arncliffe, NSW)
Katrina (Arncliffe, NSW)
Read More
I am absolutely loving Be Inspired! There are ingredients I have never worked with before so having the confidence to try something new is so much fun! The recipes are just amazing and the notes on what can be prep’d beforehand are a great help too. Thank you so much.
Deb (Belconnen, ACT)
Deb (Belconnen, ACT)
Read More
Awesome fun traveling through Emilia-Romagna experiencing first hand some of the produce I've worked with over the last couple of years cooking with Roberta's classes – the family are reaping the benefits now.
Judith (Woronora, NSW)
Judith (Woronora, NSW)
Read More
Food, wine and travel! Three of my favourite things! Be Inspired with Roberta has been a wonderful experience and given me more confidence in the kitchen. I have learnt so much, cooked things I never would have attempted without Roberta’s excellent videos, and used ingredients I have never tried before.
Sandra (Garran, ACT)
Sandra (Garran, ACT)
Read More
I'm a competent cook whose learned so much from Roberta's online cooking classes. The recipes are yummy and Roberta’s video guidance offers so many little tips to improve flavour and organise the flow of preparation. I enjoy her warmth, sense of humour, and ability to giggle at herself when she occasionally messes up.
Previous
Next

FAQ

What is boorani?

Boorani (sometimes written burani or borani) are Persian vegetable dips made with a tangy yoghurt base, they’re ideal for stimulating appetite and cutting through rich stews and other dishes.

What are the most common boorani ingredients?

Spinach is commonly used to make boorani and there’s a delicious eggplant version. I love the earthy flavour of this beetroot boorani, whether it’s made using the roots or the leaves and stems.

How do you serve boorani?

Boorani is great as a side dish or with bread as part of a mazeh (Persia’s mezze).

What is sangak?

Iran’s most iconic bread, sangak is traditionally made on a bed of hot pebbles, giving it a distinctive look and chewy texture.

Subscribe To My Newsletter & Get A Free Online Italian Cooking Class (RRP $39)